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7 Types Of Tableau Charts & Graphs To Make Your Data Visually Interactive

7 Types Of Tableau Charts & Graphs To Make Your Data Visually Interactive

Ambika Choudhury
W3Schools

Graphs and charts are the most expressive ways when it comes to showing enormous amounts of raw data in a simple manner. Tableau is known to be one of the most popular and trending data visualisations software among developers. It creates fast visualisations of data in the form of worksheets and dashboards.

Below here, we listed the top 7 types of Tableau charts and graphs one must use to make the data more visually appealing.

(The list is in alphabetical order)



1| Bubble Chart

In the bubble chart, the data is displayed with the help of circles. This type of chart helps in depicting the relationship between three or more measures. Bubble charts can visualise large volumes of data at once by varying the colour and size of the circles. 

Steps to create a Packed Bubble Chart-

Below here are the steps to create packed Bubble Chart for Sales and Profit for various products:

  1. First, you need to connect to the Sample – Superstore data source
  2. Then drag the Category dimension to Columns
  3. Drag the Sales measure to Rows
  4. Click Show Me on the toolbar to select the packed bubbles chart type
  5. Drag Region to Detail on the Marks card to include more bubbles in the view
  6. Drag Profit to Color on the Marks card
  7. Drag Region to Label on the Marks card to clarify what each bubble represents.

Know more here.

2| Box Plots

Box and Whisker Plots or simply Box Plots are used to display the distribution of data for values such as median, outliers, first quartile, third quartile, among others. Box Plot is mainly useful for comparing the variations in the data. 

Steps to create a Box Plot:

Below here are the steps to create Box Plot that shows discounts by region and customer segment:

  1. First, you need to connect to the given Sample – Superstore data source.
  2. Then drag the Segment dimension to Columns.
  3. After dragging Segment dimension, you need to drag the Discount measure to Rows.
  4. Next, the Region dimension is needed to be dragged to Columns, and drop it to the right of the Segment.
  5. Now click Show Me in the toolbar to select the box plot chart type.
  6. Drag Region from the Marks card back to Columns, to the right of Segment.
  7. To disaggregate data, select Analysis > Aggregate Measures.

Know more here.

3| Gantt Charts

Gantt Charts was invented in 1910 by Henry Gantt, and it displays a series of horizontal lines that track completed work overtime. This type of chart is useful in displaying the average delivery time for a range of products.

Steps to create a Gantt Chart:

Here are the steps to create a Gantt chart that shows discounts by region and customer segment:

  1. First, you need to connect to the given Sample – Superstore data source.
  2. Next, drag the Order Date dimension to Columns.
  3. On the Columns shelf, click the Year drop-down arrow, and then select Week Number.
  4. You need to drag the Sub-Category and Ship Mode dimensions to the Rows shelf while dropping Ship Mode to the right of Sub-Category.
  5. Next, in the toolbar menu, click Analysis > Create Calculated Field
  6. In the calculation dialogue box, you can name your calculated field OrderUntilShip.
  7. Clear any by default content in the Formula box.

Know more here.

4| Heat Maps

Heat Maps or Density maps can be used to identify locations without greater or fewer numbers of data points as well as reveal the patterns or relative concentrations that might otherwise be hidden due to an overlapping mark on a map. In Tableau, a heatmap can be created by grouping overlaying marks and colour-coding them based on the number of marks in the group.

Steps to create a Heat Map:

Below are the steps to create a Heat Map:

  1. To create a heat map, your data source should have latitude and longitude coordinates or location names.
  2. You can choose “Density” from the mark type drop-down, and Tableau will compute a density surface on your view.

Know more here.

5| Pareto Charts

A Pareto chart is a kind of chart in Tableau that contains bars as well as line graphs. In this chart, individual values are represented in descending order by bars, while the ascending cumulative total is represented by the line. 

Steps to create a Pareto Chart:

Below are the steps to create a Pareto Chart:

See Also
Autoplotter Tutorial

  1. First, create a bar chart that displays Sales by Sub-Category in descending order.
  2. Next, add a line chart that also displays Sales by Sub-Category.
  3. Then add a table calculation to the line chart to display sales by Sub-Category as a Running Total as well as a Percent of Total.

Know more here.

6| Scatter Plots

In Tableau, a scatter plot can be constituted by putting at least one measure on the Columns shelf as well as one measure on the Rows shelf. Scatter Plots can be used to visualise relationships between numerical variables.

Steps to create a Scatter plot:

Here are the steps to create a Scatter plot to compare sales to profit:

  1. Open the Sample – Superstore data source.
  2. Drag the Profit measure to Columns.
  3. Drag the Sales measure to Rows.
  4. Drag the Category dimension to Color on the Marks card.
  5. Drag the Region dimension to Detail on the Marks card.

Know more here.

7| TreeMaps

Treemaps are simple data visualisation graphs that have the ability to provide insight in a visually attractive format. This type of graph can be used to display data in nested rectangles.

Steps to create a TreeMap:

Here are the steps to create a TreeMap that shows aggregated sales totals across a range of product categories:

  1. First, you need to connect to the given Sample – Superstore data source.
  2. Next, you need to drag the Sub-Category dimension to Columns.
  3. After dragging the Sub-Category dimension, you need to drag the Sales measure to Rows.
  4. Next, click Show Me on the toolbar to select the treemap chart type.
  5. Then, drag the Ship Mode dimension to Color on the Marks card.
  6. Lastly, drag the Profit measure to Color on the Marks card. 

Know more here.

(Image Source: Here)

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